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Lydia Ruggiero's Blog

What is a title reader?
by Lydia Ruggiero | 2017/03/08 |

How many times do people ask what my job title is vs. how many times they follow-up with the question, "What is it that you exactly do?" Is basically equal. It is so rare that someone outside of the Title Insurance field understands my job as a Title Reader. So let me describe what it is that us title readers actually do for a living.

Lydia Ruggiero's Blog ::

 You sign a contract for a piece of property, either commercial or residential, next either an attorney representing you or a loan officer you are getting a mortgage through will order title through a respectable title company. Once the exam and municipal searches are ordered, a reader (me) will examine the abstract.

What is it that we examine, exactly?

We look through the chain of title, making sure there are no defects, i.e., breaks in the chain (meaning deeds are recorded from seller to purchaser with no missing parties, for example A transfers to B, B transfers to C and then C should transfer to D but a deed was never recorded and the record shows D transferring to E). An exception will be raised to clear that issue to show title to be clean and clear.

We should look to make sure the legal description matches the tax map and the survey map to show we are insuring the right property as shown in public records.

You wouldn't want to be made responsible for a prior owners judgments/liens that they should have paid for right? As a reader, I make sure to raise any judgments/liens against prior owners and buyers to make sure they do not attach to the property. Again, so by the time the owners and lenders policies are brought to closing, title is clear!

We also check for easements and covenants and restrictions to make sure that you are aware of recorded documents that you made be benefitted or burdened from. It is our job to read these documents and know exactly what they state.

We check bankruptcy records, estate proceedings, land under water issues and virtually anything that may affect you and the property you are purchasing or taking a mortgage against.

Mortgages are the biggest problems in NY. I do mainly NY work, so for me, I have to make sure the correct mortgage tax was paid and that all mortgages state everything that is necessary. In NY many people record CEMA's to avoid mortgage tax (we are one of the few places that have mortgage tax) so I check for a gap mortgage and then review those CEMA docs to make sure they contain the language that actually makes the document correct.

I hope that this helps to explain what us readers do for a living. This does not explain it all but it does give a good description on what I do on a day to day basis.




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627 words | 1357 views | 7 comments | log in or register to post a comment


Title Reader vs. Title Examiner
Thanks for the informative blog.  Just curious, why do you prefer the term, title reader to title examiner (They seem to have exactly the same role) ? 
by Don (Chunshen) Li | 2017/03/13 | log in or register to post a reply

RE: Reader vs. Examiner
I have always been used to the term reader. In my opinion and experience, I refer to the examiner as the person in the field who I get my search from. It also depends where you are, some states just use different titles. 
by Lydia Ruggiero | 2017/03/13 | log in or register to post a reply

Another comment/question
I'm also curious.  Have you done "Record Documents" work as a part of title insurance process or just title reading only? 
by Don (Chunshen) Li | 2017/03/15 | log in or register to post a reply

RE: Another comment/question
I'm sorry, I don't know if I understand what you mean by that, do you mean do I do recordings? If so, no I don't do recordings. But if you mean something else, just let me know and I will be happy to answer the question. 
by Lydia Ruggiero | 2017/03/15 | log in or register to post a reply

yeah recording
that's what I meant, thanks anyway. 
by Don (Chunshen) Li | 2017/03/16 | log in or register to post a reply

Well Said
Excellent overview.  In Northern California the term "examiner" has come into exclusive use.  With the differences in state law, muni liens are either in the Official Records or property taxes, so one fewer set of records to research if you do both jobs.  No mtg tax to compute either.  Maybe a few more maps to review for lot line validation.  UCC Financing filing as appropriate too. 
by William Pattison | 2017/03/29 | log in or register to post a reply

Thank you William
Thank you for the compliment. So interesting hearing about the differences of title nationwide. I am trying to get out to see California soon. 
by Lydia Ruggiero | 2017/03/30 | log in or register to post a reply
Lydia Ruggiero's Blog

 

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Recent Comments

Thank you for the compliment. So interesting hearing about the differences of title nation...
by Lydia Ruggiero
Excellent overview.  In Northern California the term "examiner" has come into exclusive use. &n...
by William Pattison
that's what I meant, thanks anyway....
by Don (Chunshen) Li
I'm sorry, I don't know if I understand what you mean by that, do you mean do I do recordings? ...
by Lydia Ruggiero
I'm also curious.  Have you done "Record Documents" work as a part of title insurance process o...
by Don (Chunshen) Li
I have always been used to the term reader. In my opinion and experience, I refer to the examiner as...
by Lydia Ruggiero
Thanks for the informative blog.  Just curious, why do you prefer the term, title reader to tit...
by Don (Chunshen) Li
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